EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

David Weisburd, Ph.D. | Curriculum Vitae
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David Weisburd is Executive Director of the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy. Professor Weisburd is one of the leading international researchers in crime and justice and has received many awards for his contributions to criminology and crime prevention. These include: the Stockholm Prize in Criminology (2010); the Klachky Family Prize for the Advancement of the Frontiers of Science (2011); the Jerry Lee Award for Lifetime Achievement in Experimental Criminology; the Robert Boruch Award for distinctive contributions to research that influences public policy (2014); the Sutherland Award for “outstanding contributions to the discipline of criminology” (2014); the Israel Prize (2015); the ASC Award for “excellence in mentorship in the discipline of Criminology and Criminal Justice” (2016); and the August Vollmer Award for contributions to the prevention of crime (2017). He is author or editor of more than twenty-five books and more than 175 scientific articles that cover a wide range of criminal justice research topics, including crime at place, violent crime, white collar crime, policing, illicit markets, criminal justice statistics and social deviance.

 

DIRECTOR

Cynthia Lum, Ph.D. | Curriculum Vitae
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Dr. Cynthia Lum is a Professor of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University and Director of its Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy. Her research focuses on policing tactics, strategies, technology, and organization, crime prevention and deterrence, and evidence-based crime policy. With Professors Christopher Koper and Cody Telep, she has developed tools to help translate research into practice. Professor Lum is an appointed member of the Committee on Law and Justice for the National Academies of Sciences (NAS), and has also served on the NAS’s Committee on Proactive Policing as well as its Standing Committee on Traffic Law Enforcement. She is a member of the National Police Foundation Board of Directors, the Research Advisory Committee of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, an Executive Counselor for the American Society of Criminology, and the co-founder of the International Summer School for Policing Scholars. She is the founding editor of Translational Criminology Magazine. Her new book (with Christopher Koper) is Evidence-Based Policing: Translating Research into Practice (Oxford).

 

DEPUTY DIRECTOR

Charlotte Gill, Ph.D. | Curriculum Vitae
Dr. Charlotte Gill is an Assistant Professor and Deputy Director of the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society, George Mason University. Her primary research interests are community- and place-based crime prevention approaches, particularly with juveniles and youth; community policing; program evaluation; and research synthesis. Dr. Gill has over ten years of experience in applied experimental and quasi-experimental research and is currently partnering with several police departments and community groups around the United States to develop and test community-led approaches to place-based prevention and improve police responses to people with mental health issues. Dr. Gill also serves as the co-editor of the Campbell Collaboration Crime and Justice Group. She is a 2017-19 Andrew Carnegie Fellow and has received several awards and honors, including the 2019 SCHEV Outstanding Faculty – Rising Star award.

 

PRINCIPAL CEBCP FELLOW

Christopher Koper, Ph.D. | Curriculum Vitae
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Dr. Christopher S. Koper is an Associate Professor in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University and the Principal Fellow of George Mason’s Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy. Dr. Koper holds a Ph.D. in criminology and criminal justice (University of Maryland) and has nearly 30 years of experiencing conducting criminological research at George Mason, the Police Executive Research Forum, the University of Pennsylvania, the Urban Institute, the RAND Corporation, the Police Foundation, and other organizations. Dr. Koper specializes in issues related to policing, firearms, and program evaluation. His current research focuses on police technology, police crime control strategies, the institutionalization of evidence-based practices in policing, and regulation of assault weapons. Dr. Koper’s work on methods of patrolling crime hot spots (known as the “Koper curve” principle) is used by numerous police agencies worldwide, and he is the co-developer of the Evidence-Based Policing Matrix.

 

EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT

Ms. Naida Kuruvilla

 

SENIOR FELLOWS

Jeff Beeson (GMU-HIDTA) 
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Jeff Beeson serves as the Deputy Director and Chief of Staff for the Washington/Baltimore High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (W/B HIDTA) program. His responsibilities include the overall administration of the HIDTA program including the budget, Annual Report, Threat Assessment and Strategy, the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP), as well as direct oversight of the treatment, prevention, and training initiatives. Additionally, he is responsible for managing the non-HIDTA grants and contracts that support new and existing law enforcement, criminal justice, drug treatment and prevention, homeland security, technology, and information sharing initiatives. Prior to joining the W/B HIDTA, Jeff served as Assistant Vice President for Applied Research at Towson University, overseeing a portfolio of state and federal grants and contracts supporting workforce and public safety initiatives. Jeff, appointed to several positions within Maryland state government including the Maryland Department of Public Safety, began his career as a senate staffer for US Senator Barbara A. Mikulski of Maryland. Jeff has a Master’s Degree in Social Sciences, with a focus in criminal justice.

Henry Brownstein
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Henry H. Brownstein has been Associate Dean for Research in the Wilder School at VCU (2014-17); a Senior VP and Senior Fellow at NORC at the University of Chicago (2005-2014); Center Director at Abt Associates (2004-05); Division Director at the NIJ (2000-2004); Professor and Graduate Program Director at the University of Baltimore (1995-2000); Principal Researcher and the Statistical Analysis Center Director for the NYS Division of Criminal Justice Services (1982-95); and Assistant Professor at Russell Sage College (1977-82). And he has conducted research and policy studies for other organizations. He has been awarded $10 million in grants and has published seven books, more than 60 journal articles plus numerous book chapters, government reports, and essays. He was awarded his PhD in sociology from Temple University in 1977. He is the recipient of the Senior Scholar Award for 2017 from the ASA Section on Alcohol, Drugs, and Tobacco.

Jim Bueermann, The Police Foundation
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Jim Bueermann is former Chief of Police in the Redlands, CA Police Department. He worked for the Redlands Police Department from 1978 until his retirement in June 2011, serving in every unit within the department. He was appointed Police Chief and Director of Housing, Recreation and Senior Services in May 1998. He holds a bachelor’s degree from California State University at San Bernardino and a master’s degree from the University of Redlands. In early 2007, he was named Honorary Fellow to the Academy of Experimental Criminology.

Jim Burch, The Police Foundation
pic-burchJim Burch is the Vice President for Strategic Initiatives at the Police Foundation, overseeing the Foundation’s efforts to advance policing through innovations in practice and technology as well as the Foundation’s strategic programs and management services. Prior to joining the Police Foundation in early 2015, Mr. Burch served for more than 20 years at the U.S. Department of Justice, having been appointed to various senior executive and leadership positions, including Acting Director of the Bureau of Justice Assistance (2009-2011), Deputy Assistant Attorney General (2011-2014) of the Office of Justice Programs (OJP), and Acting Assistant Director at the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) (2014-2015).

Tom Carr, High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas (HIDTA) program
CarrThomas H. Carr is the Executive Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy’s (ONDCP) Washington/Baltimore High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) Program, a position he has held since 1994. He also serves as Executive Director of the University of Baltimore’s Center for Drug Policy and Enforcement and the George Mason University HIDTA Program. Prior to accepting his position with the Washington/Baltimore HIDTA, Mr. Carr was a Lt. Colonel with the Maryland State Police and retired as chief of the Bureau of Drug Enforcement.

Guoqing Diao, George Mason University
DiaoGuoqing Diao is Associate Professor of Statistics at George Mason University. He received his doctoral training in Biostatistics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and won the Barry H. Margolin Dissertation Award in 2006. His research focuses on development of statistical methods for the designs and analyses of biomedical and public health studies. His current research areas include precision medicine, survival analysis, semiparametric models, longitudinal data analysis, high-dimensional data analysis, statistical genetics, and rare event simulation problem. Dr. Diao has published extensively in both statistical journals including Biometrics, Biometrika, and Annals of Applied Probability, and medical journals such as American Journal of Human Genetics and PM&R. Recently, working closely with Dr. Cynthia Lum and Dr. Christopher Koper., Dr. Diao also broadened his research to include the area of policing and crime prevention. Dr. Diao’s research is funded by NSF, NIH, and industry.

Beidi Dong, George Mason University
pic-dongDr. Beidi Dong is an Assistant Professor of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University. He received his PhD from the Department of Sociology and Criminology & Law at the University of Florida in 2015. His research interests center around understanding the causes of youth violence, identifying risk and protective factors, and promoting resilience among both perpetrators and victims. Gang-related and firearm violence are two areas of focus that lead to both serious physical harm (including death), and emotional and social-behavioral problems in young people. His research mainly follows two theoretical frameworks–one emphasizes development as a unifying concept and the other studies social ecology of crime and violence. With postdoctoral training in epidemiologic methodology, Dr. Dong integrates cutting-edge research designs and methods to solve criminological challenges.

Yasemin Irvin-Erickson, George Mason University
pic-Irvin-EricksonDr. Yasemin Irvin-Erickson is an Assistant Professor of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University. She received her PhD from Rutgers School of Criminal Justice in 2014. She researches primarily in the area of economic empowerment of vulnerable populations, urban security, victimization, and technology using quantitative and mixed-method study designs. Her recent work in this area includes evaluating the economic impact of violence on vulnerable populations, enablers and barriers to women’s economic empowerment, the potential uses of technology in response to violence and victimization, and translating best available evidence on crime and victimization into actionable knowledge for practitioners.

Stephen Mastrofski, George Mason University
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Stephen Mastrofski is University Professor Emeritus in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University. His research interests include police discretion, police organizations and their reform, and systematic field observation methods in criminology. His publications cover implementation and impact of community policing, Compstat, body cameras, proactive policing, and law enforcement CEOs as agents of change. Using systematic observation, his research has included police officer decision making and performance, arrest, search and seizure, use of force, procedural justice, and citizen compliance. In 2000 he received the O.W. Wilson Award from the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences for education, research, and service on policing. In 2008 he and his coauthors received the Law and Society Association’s article. In 2010 he was elected a Fellow of the American Society of Criminology. He received the 2015 Lifetime Achievement Award from the Division of Policing of the American Society of Criminology.

Linda Merola, George Mason University
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Dr. Linda M. Merola is an Associate Professor of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University. Professor Merola’s academic interests relate to civil liberties, constitutional law, the judiciary, public opinion and legal psychology. She has published articles concerning terrorism, civil liberties, the judiciary, and various topics related to the public’s interaction with and knowledge of the criminal justice system. Professor Merola received a Ph.D. in government from Georgetown University, where she was awarded the Harold N. Glassman Dissertation Award for the most accomplished dissertation in the social science disciplines. In addition, Professor Merola holds a J.D. from the George Washington University Law School, where she served on The George Washington Law Review and was admitted to the Virginia State Bar Association. Professor Merola has also received advanced training in research methodology, statistics and survey/experimental methods through the National Science Foundation and Duke University, as well at the University of Michigan as a recipient of the Miller Scholarship.

Anthony Petrosino, WestEd
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Anthony Petrosino, is Director of WestEd’s Justice & Prevention Research Center and Associate Director of the Health and Justice Program. He is also Senior Fellow at the Center for Evidence-based Crime Policy at George Mason University. Petrosino is currently co-Investigator on 7 federally funded research studies, including several randomized controlled trials funded by the U.S. National Institute of Justice. He also serves as non-voting expert on the Nevada Governor’s Task Force on School Safety. Petrosino received WestEd’s Paul D. Hood Award for Distinguished Contribution to the Field and was named Honorary Fellow by the Academy of Experimental Criminology. He also serves on the Editorial Board for the Journal of Experimental Criminology and has co-authored over 150 reports, journal articles, book chapters and other publications.

Allison Redlich, George Mason University
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Allison Redlich is a Professor in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University. She earned in PhD in Psychology at the University of California, Davis and then completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the Stanford University School of Medicine. In addition to her research interests in mental health courts and guilty pleas, Professor Redlich conducts research on the most effective methods to interview and interrogate suspects, and reduce the likelihood of false confessions. She has received support from the High-Value Detainee Interrogation Group (HIG) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation to examine the contextual and dynamic aspects of interrogation in criminal law enforcement and military settings, and from the Brain and Behavioral Research Foundation to examine the interrogation experiences of offenders with mental illness. She is the co-editor of the 2016 two-volume “International Developments and Practices in Investigative Interviewing and Interrogation” (Vol 1: Victims and Witnesses; Vol 2: Suspected Offenders) and the co-author of a 2010 scientific consensus paper on police-induced confessions. Professor Redlich currently sits on the editorial boards of five academic journals.

Laurie O. Robinson, George Mason University
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Laurie Robinson came to George Mason in 2012 as the Clarence J. Robinson Professor of Criminology, Law and Society after more than three decades working on national criminal justice policy. Reflecting that ongoing engagement, she was named by President Obama in 2014 to co-chair the White House Task Force on 21st Century Policing, and also in 2014, was named to the Congressionally created Colson Task Force on crowding in the federal prison system. She currently sits on the New York City Independent Commission on Criminal Justice and Incarceration Reform (the “Rikers Commission”). Robinson twice served as Assistant Attorney General for the U.S. Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs, DOJ’s research, statistics and criminal justice assistance agency. Between her stints at DOJ, Robinson directed Penn’s Master of Science Program in Criminology. She serves on a number of national boards, including the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Law and Justice.

Nigel Waters, University of Calgary (Emeritus)
pic-watersNigel Waters taught at the University of Calgary from 1975 to 2007. He was promoted to Full Professor in 1990 and in 1999 became the Founding Director of the Masters in GIS Program at the University of Calgary. In 2007 he joined GMU and was appointed as a Full Professor in the Department of Geography and Geoinformation Science and the Director of the Center of Excellence for Geographic information Science. These positions he held until 2014 when he was subsequently appointed as an Affiliate Faculty Member in the College of Science. He has published extensively in the peer reviewed literature on the application of GIScience in transportation, medical geography, environmental science, spatial statistics and related areas. He is a former President of the Western Canadian Association of Geographers, and was an associate editor of GeoWorld (previously GIS World) where for 21 years he contributed the Edge Nodes column (1989-2014). In 2014 he co-edited the book Data Mining for Geoinformatics: Methods and Applications. From 2011 to 2014 he was the Editor of Cartographica: The International Journal for Geographic Information and Geovisualization. In 2014 he received the Award of Distinction from the Canadian Cartographic Association and in 2015 was the recipient of the Inaugural Award from the GIScience Study Group of the Canadian Association of Geographers for Lifetime Achievement and GIScience Excellence. In 2017 he contributed articles on the History of GIS and Tobler’s First Law of Geography to the International Encyclopedia of Geography. He has served on a number of graduate advisory committees in the Center for Evidenced-Based Crime Policy.

James Willis, George Mason University
pic-willisJames Willis is an Associate Professor in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University. He earned his B.A. in Administration of Justice from The Pennsylvania State University and Ph.D. in sociology from Yale University. At Yale he was a Jacob K. Javits Fellow and his dissertation examining the transportation of British convicts to America and Australia was awarded the Sociology Department’s Marvin B. Sussman prize for the best dissertation submitted in the past two years. In 2008 he and his coauthors, Stephen Mastrofski and David Weisburd, received the Law and Society Association’s article prize for a paper they published on Compstat. His current research focuses on examining the craft of policing (including its relationship to science) and assessing the effects of technology on police organization and practice.

David Wilson, George Mason University
pic-wilsonDavid B. Wilson, PhD, is a Professor and Chair of the Criminology, Law and Society Department at George Mason University. His research interests focus broadly on issues related to changing the criminal behavior of juvenile and adult offenders. More specifically, his research examines the effectiveness of offender rehabilitation and crime prevention efforts. He is also interested in advancing meta-analysis and program evaluation methods. His researched has focused on a range of topics, including the effectiveness of juvenile delinquency interventions, juvenile curfews, school-based prevention programs, correctional boot-camps, court-mandated batterer intervention programs, and drug-courts; the effects of sugar on children’s behavior; and the effects of alcohol on violent behavior. He co-authored a book on the methods of meta-analysis with Mark Lipsey that is widely used. He is an co-editor of the Journal of Experimental Criminology, past consulting editor for Psychological Bulletin, and editor of Crime and Justice Group of the Campbell Collaboration. He was awarded the Marcia Guttentag Award for Early Promise as an Evaluator by the American Evaluation Association in 1999 and the Frederick Mosteller Award for Distinctive Contributions to Systematic Reviewing.

Sue-Ming Yang, George Mason University
YangSue-Ming Yang is an associate professor in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University. She received her PhD from the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Maryland. Her current research focuses on understanding the relationship between stereotypes, race, and perceived disorder in urban settings. Specifically, her research findings showed that the presence of physical disorder increased respondents’ ratings of overall disorderliness. Additionally, places with the presence of individuals dressed in Hip-Hop styles and have darker skin tones were more likely to be viewed as disorderly by experimental respondents (police officers, students, and parolees). She also studies place-based criminology, disorder-crime association, experimental research methods, and international terrorism trends and eco-terrorism in the U.S.

 

RESEARCH ASSOCIATES & POST DOCS

Amber Scherer, Ph.D. | Curriculum Vitae
pic-schererAmber Scherer completed her PhD in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society. She is the GMU-HIDTA (High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area Program) Coordinator for the Center for Evidence Based Crime Policy. She received her MA in Forensic Psychology from the John Jay College of Criminal Justice. She formerly worked as a part-time research associate at the Police Foundation in Washington, DC and with the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Behavioral Science Unit in Quantico, VA. Her research interests include evidence-based policing practices, the translation and implementation of research into law enforcement practice, the effectiveness of criminal investigative practices, and wrongful convictions. Her dissertation focused on identifying effective practices for robbery investigations.

Xiaoyun Wu, M.A., ABD 
pic-wuXiaoyun Wu is currently a doctoral student in the Criminology, Law and Society Program at George Mason University. She received a Bachelor in Law from China University of Political Science and Law in 2013 and a Masters of Arts in Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University. Her research interests include evidence-based policing, crime and place, experimental criminology, and law and criminal justice.

 

RESEARCH ASSISTANTS

Muneeba Azam, B.A.
AzamMuneeba Azam is currently a master’s student in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University. She received a BA in Criminology with a concentration in Homeland Security and a BA in Global Affairs with a concentration in Global Governance, both from George Mason University, in 2018. Her research interests include policing, social inequality, juvenile delinquency, terrorism, and mental health.

 

Tori Goldberg, M.A. 
pic-goldbergTori Goldberg is a doctoral student in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University. She received an MA in Criminology, Law, and Society from George Mason University in 2013 and her BA in Psychology from Clark University in 2011. Her research interests include evidence based crime interventions, organizational issues, re-entry and corrections, and the intersection between mental health and the criminal justice system.

 

Michael Goodier, M.A. 
GoodierMichael is currently a doctoral student in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University. He received his M.A. in Criminology and Criminal Justice from the University of Maryland, College Park in 2018 and his B.A. in Criminology and Criminal Justice with a minor in Spanish Language and Culture from the University of Maryland, College Park in 2015. His research interests include place-based criminology, the disorder-crime association, and policing.

 

Rachel Jensen, M.A. 
jensenRachel Jensen is currently a masters student in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society. A former Schreyer Scholar, she graduated with honors from Penn State with her bachelors in Applied Psychology. Her research interests include evidence-based policy and police training on mental health, particularly Autism Spectrum Disorder.

 

William Johnson, M.A.
johnson William Johnson is a doctoral student and Provost Scholar in the Department of Criminology Law and Society at George Mason University. He received a Bachelors of Science in Criminology from George Mason University in December 2012 with a minor in Sociology. His research interests include hate crime legislation and implementation, organizations, and the use of emergent technology in policing.

 

L. Caitlin Kanewske, M.S.
kanewske L. Caitlin Kanewske is a doctoral student in the department of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University. She received her MS degree in Justice, Law and Society from American University in 2014 and her BA in English from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) in 2010. From 2010 to 2011 she was a security threat group special instructor within the New Mexico Corrections Department. Her research interests include evidence-based crime interventions, mental health, prison reform, and correctional programming.

 

Yi-Fang Lu, M.A.
Lu Yi-Fang Lu is currently a doctoral student in the Criminology, Law and Society Department. She received her B.A. in Psychology from National Taiwan University and her M.A. in Criminology from National Taipei University. Her research interests include mental health and the criminal justice system, substance abuse, crime and place, and quantitative research methods.

 

Jordan Nichols, M.A.
nichols Jordan Nichols is a doctoral student in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society. She received her M.A. in Criminology from the Department in December 2016. Her research interests include policing, homeland security, and evidence-based policy. Jordan is currently working on policing and security projects within the Center.

 

Kevin Petersen, M.S.  
Petersen Kevin Petersen is a doctoral student in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University. He received his M.S. in Criminal Justice from Radford University in 2015 and his B.S. in Sociology from Virginia Polytechnic and State University in 2012. From 2016 to 2018 he worked as a victim/witness coordinator for the Roanoke County (VA) Commonwealth’s Attorney’s Office. His research interests include crime and place, evidence-based crime interventions, guilty pleas, and legal decision-making.

Heather Prince, M.A. 
prince Heather Prince is currently a doctoral student in Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason. She earned her M.S. in Criminology from the University of Pennsylvania in 2018, and her B.A. in criminology from Albright college in 2017. She served as an intern for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives in Philadelphia for the summer of 2018. Her research interests include school violence, domestic violence, policing, juvenile delinquency, crime and place, and corrections.

Megan Stoltz, M.A. 
stoltzMegan Stoltz is a doctoral student in the department and a Presidential Scholar. She received a BA in psychology and a BS in management, both from George Mason University, and a MA in forensic psychology from Marymount University. Her interests include evidence-based crime policy, terrorism, corrections, legal psychology, and the intersection of mental health and the criminal justice system.

 

Sean Wire, M.A.
pic-wireSean Wire is currently a doctoral student in the Criminology, Law, and Society Department at George Mason University and a graduate research assistant at the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy. He received a B.S. in Criminology and B.A. in Psychology from The College of New Jersey in 2015 and an M.A. in Criminology, Law and Society from George Mason University in 2018. His research interests include evidence-based crime interventions, policy application, crime and place, and policing.

 

Taryn Zastrow 
ZastrowTaryn Zastrow is a doctoral student in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University. She received her BA in Psychology in 2016 from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Taryn previously worked as a research assistant at the Police Foundation in Washington, DC. Her research interests include evidence-based crime interventions, policing, crime and place, and translating research into practice.

 

 

AFFILIATED SCHOLARS

Martin Andresen (Simon Fraser University)
andresen
Dr. Martin A. Andresen is a professor in the School of Criminology and Institute for Canadian Urban Research Studies at Simon Fraser University. He is also an associate member of the Department of Geography, Simon Fraser University. Dr. Andresen received his B.A. and M.A. degrees in economics from Simon Fraser University, and his Ph.D. in geography from the University of British Columbia. Dr. Andresen’s research interests are in crime and places, environmental criminology, the geography of crime, spatial crime analysis, and applied spatial statistics and geographical information analysis. Most of Dr. Andresen’s recent research has involved investigations of the spatial aspect of criminal events at a variety of scales and various applications of the spatial point pattern test he developed. He is a member of the Crime and Place Working Group within the CEBCP Research Program on Crime and Place and is on the editorial boards for Journal of Criminal Justice; Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice; International Criminal Justice Review; Criminology, Criminal Justice, Law & Society; and Methodological Innovations Online.

Breanne Cave (U.S. Government Accountability Office)
Cave2Breanne Cave is a Senior Social Science Analyst at the U.S. Government Accountability Office. She has worked on a number of federally funded research projects on police technology, homeland security, and public health and safety. Her research on policing, crime and place, and homeland security issues can be found in the Journal of Experimental Criminology, Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies and Management, and Police Policy and Research: An International Journal, as well as in edited volumes on crime and place and counter-terrorism. Breanne received her B.A. in Criminal Justice and M.A. in Justice Administration from Norwich University. She received her PhD in Criminology, Law & Society from George Mason University in Spring 2016.

Julie Grieco (Police Foundation)
pic-griecoDr. Julie Grieco is a Senior Research Associate at the Police Foundation. She received her B.S. in Psychology from the University of Central Florida in 2007, her M.A. in Forensic Psychology from Marymount University in 2008, and her Ph.D. in Criminology, Law and Society from George Mason University in 2016. While at George Mason, she worked for five years for CEBCP as a graduate research assistant on the Matrix Demonstration Project. Her research interests include the individual determinants of adoption of evidence-based practices, public opinion of the police, and the translation of research knowledge for everyday use by practitioners.

Elizabeth Groff (Temple University)
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Dr. Elizabeth Groff is a professor in the Temple University Department of Criminal Justice. Dr. Groff received her B.S. and M.A. degrees in geography from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte and Ph.D. in geography from the University of Maryland at College Park. She also has an M.A. in criminology and criminal justice from the University of Maryland at College Park. Dr. Groff’s primary research interests are in crime and place; modeling geographical influences on human activity; agent-based modeling as a methodology; crime prevention; and policing. Her most recent research is a field experiment testing whether citizen notification can prevent subsequent burglaries which is being conducted in partnership with the Baltimore County, MD and the Redlands, CA Police Departments (with Travis Taniguchi). She is a member of the Crime and Place Working Group within the CEBCP Research Program on Crime and Place.

Julie Hibdon (Southern Illinois University)
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Dr. Julie Hibdon is an associate professor in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Southern Illinois University Carbondale. She formerly was a Research Associate in the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy. She received her Ph.D. in Criminology, Law and Society from George Mason University in 2011. She also holds an M.A. in Administration of Justice from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. Dr. Hibdon’s research interests include crime and place, cognitions of crime places and dangerous places, fear of crime, and policing. Dr. Hibdon has worked and collaborated on a number of research projects including the Trinidad and Tobago Police Service Project; an experimental evaluation of License Plate Recognition (LPR) Technologies for Law Enforcement; an evaluation of Transportation Security Administration (TSA) strategy to security at airports; and most recently an evaluation of the impact of technologies on police organizations and practices.

Josh Hinkle (Georgia State University)
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Dr. Joshua Hinkle is an associate professor in the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology at Georgia State University. He received his doctoral degree in criminology and criminal justice from the University of Maryland in the summer of 2009 after completing his Master’s degree in the department in May 2005. Dr. Hinkle’s research interests include evidence-based policing, the disorder-crime nexus, fear of crime and experimental methods. His research has been funded by the National Institute of Justice and the National Science Foundation. His work appears in journals such as Criminology, Criminology & Public Policy, and the Journal of Experimental Criminology.

Brian Lawton, John Jay College (CUNY)
pic-lawtonDr. Brian Lawton is an associate professor in the Department of Criminal Justice at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City. Prior to coming to John Jay he has worked as an Assistant Professor at Sam Houston State University and most recently at George Mason University. His research interests focus on the intersection of crime and health, place and crime, and fear and safety concerns. He received his doctorate in Criminal Justice from Temple University and has had research articles published in journals such as Justice Quarterly, Quantitative Criminology and the Journal of Crime and Delinquency.

Ajima Olaghere, Temple University
pic-lawtonDr. Ajima Olaghere is an assistant professor in the Department of Criminal Justice at Temple University. She received her Ph.D. from George Mason University in Criminology, Law and Society in 2015. She also received her M.A. from George Mason University in Justice, Law, and Crime Policy in 2010. While attending George Mason University she served as a graduate research assistant for the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy and as a post doctoral research fellow under Dr. David B. Wilson learning the latest quantitative and qualitative data synthesis techniques also known as meta-analysis and meta-aggregation. Dr. Olaghere’s research interest include integrating qualitative and quantitative research elements, meta-synthesis, and exploring models to improve police and community relations.

Travis Taniguchi (RTI International)
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Travis Taniguchi is a Research Criminologist at RTI International.. He received his B.S. in Criminology and Criminal Justice from Chaminade University of Honolulu and his M.A. and Ph.D. in Criminal Justice from Temple University. His research interests include program and policy evaluation, crime and place, street gang dynamics, and the spatial distribution of drug markets. He is dedicated to expanding and evaluating the partnerships between researchers and practitioners. His publications can be found in Justice Quarterly and the Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency.

Gheorghe Tecuci (George Mason University)
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Dr. Gheorghe Tecuci is Professor of Computer Science and Director of the Learning Agents Center at George Mason University (http://lac.gmu.edu), member of the Romanian Academy, and former chair of Artificial Intelligence at the U.S. Army War College. He has followed a career-long interest in the advancement of a computational theory and technology for the development of cognitive assistants that learn complex problem-solving expertise directly from human experts, support experts and non-experts in problem solving and decision making, and teach their problem-solving expertise to students. This theory has recently been extended with a computational theory of evidence-based reasoning, and has been employed in the development of powerful cognitive assistants for intelligence analysis. He has published over 190 papers and has recently co-authored two books, “Knowledge Engineering: Building Personal Learning Assistants for Evidence-based Reasoning,” and “Intelligence Analysis as Discovery of Evidence, Hypotheses, and Arguments: Finding and Connecting the Dots.”

Cody Telep (Arizona State University)
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Cody Telep is an Assistant Professor in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Arizona State University. He received his PhD from the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University in 2013. While at George Mason, he worked for five years for CEBCP as a graduate research assistant and research associate. He received an MA from the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Maryland in 2008. His research interests include innovations in policing, experimental criminology, evidence-based policy, and police education. His recent work has appeared in Justice Quarterly, Police Quarterly, Journal of Criminal Justice Education, and Journal of Experimental Criminology.

Clair White (University of Wyoming)
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Clair White is an assistant professor at the University of Wyoming. She completed her Ph.D. student at Arizona State University in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice. Her research interests include communities and crime, mental health and use of service, and illicit prescription drug use. She is currently implementing a mental health community policing program in Baltimore that focuses on connecting residents of crime hot spots to mental health and behavioral services.

Alese Wooditch (Temple University)
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Alese Wooditch is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice at Temple University. She received her PhD from the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University in 2016. While attending George Mason University, she served three years as a graduate research assistant in the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy and four years as a research associate in the Center for Advancing Correctional Excellence. She formerly served as a Criminal Intelligence Analyst with the U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Labor Racketeering and Fraud Investigations. Alese received her MA in criminal justice from Penn State University in 2009. Her research interests include crime and place, risk-needs-responsivity, experimental and computational criminology, quantitative methods, and human trafficking.

 

VISITING SCHOLARS

Victoria Garnett (2015 Fulbright Scholar, Metropolitan Police Service, London UK)
Richie Adams (2014 Fulbright Scholar, Police Scotland)
Serena Favarin (2013, from Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore – Milano)
Professor Sue-Ming Yang (2013-2014, from National Chung Cheng University)

 

INTERNS

Kemberly Viveros (OSCAR Work-Study, 2018-19)
Elizabeth Rosen (2018-2019)
Stephanie Galarza (2018)
Roy Figuereo (2018)
Elizabeth A. Rosen (2018)
Aimee Arceneaux (2017)
Connor Xavios (Spring, 2015)
Jordan Nichols (2012)
Jacqueline Davis (Summer 2011, from University of Queensland, Australia)
Felicia Keith (Summer 2010, from UC-Irvine)
Sarah Parham (Summer 2010, Undergraduate Apprenticeship Award Winner)
Laura Coffrin (Spring 2010)
Monika Singh (Fall 2009)
Brittany Davenport (Fall 2008-Spring 2009)