EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

David Weisburd, Ph.D. | Curriculum Vitae
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David Weisburd is a Distinguished Professor at George Mason University and Director of the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy. He also holds a part time joint appointment as the Walter E. Meyer Professor of Law and Criminal Justice at the Hebrew University Faculty of Law in Jerusalem. He serves as Chief Science Adviser at the Police Foundation in Washington DC and is Chair of its Research Advisory Committee. Professor Weisburd is an elected Fellow of the American Society of Criminology and of the Academy of Experimental Criminology. He is a member of the Science Advisory Board of the Office of Justice Programs, the Steering Committee of the Campbell Crime and Justice Group, and the Scientific Commission of the International Society of Criminology. He is also a National Associate of the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences, and the Chair of the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Proactive Policing. Professor Weisburd is one of the leading international researchers in crime and justice. He is author or editor of more than twenty-five books and more than 175 scientific articles that cover a wide range of criminal justice research topics, including crime at place, violent crime, white collar crime, policing, illicit markets, criminal justice statistics and social deviance. Professor Weisburd was the founding Editor of the Journal of Experimental Criminology and is the General Editor of the Journal of Quantitative Criminology. He has received many awards for his contributions to criminology and crime prevention. These include: the Stockholm Prize in Criminology (2010); the Klachky Family Prize for the Advancement of the Frontiers of Science (2011); the Jerry Lee Award for Lifetime Achievement in Experimental Criminology (Division of Experimental Criminology, ASC, 2014), the Robert Boruch Award for distinctive contributions to research that influences public policy of the Campbell Collaboration (2014); the Sutherland Award for “outstanding contributions to the discipline of criminology” (ASC, 2014); the Israel Prize (generally regarded as the State of Israel’s highest civilian honor) (2015); the Mentoring Award for “excellence in mentorship in the discipline of Criminology and Criminal Justice” (ASC, 2016); and the August Vollmer Award for contributions to the prevention of crime (ASC, 2017).

 

DIRECTOR

Cynthia Lum, Ph.D. | Curriculum Vitae
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Dr. Cynthia Lum is a Professor of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University and Director of its Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy. She researches primarily in the area of policing, security, and evidence-based crime policy. Her works in this area have included evaluations of policing interventions and police technology, understanding the translation and receptivity of research in policing, and assessing security efforts of federal agencies. With Dr. Christopher Koper, she has developed the Evidence-Based Policing Matrix (with Cody Telep) and the Matrix Demonstration Projects, translation tools designed to help police practitioners incorporate research into their strategic and tactical portfolio. Dr. Lum has been appointed to the Committee on Proactive Policing for the National Academy of Sciences, is a member of the Standing Committee on Traffic Law Enforcement, Transportation Research Board (National Academies of Sciences), the Research Advisory Committee of the IACP, the International Advisory Committee of the Scottish Institute for Police Research, and the Board of Trustees for the Pretrial Justice Institute. Dr. Lum is a Fulbright Specialist in policing and criminology and in 2016 implemented the first International Summer School for Policing Scholarship at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland with colleagues from SIPR. She is the founding editor of Translational Criminology Magazine and the Springer Series on Translational Criminology. Her new book (with Christopher Koper) is Evidence-Based Policing: Translating Research into Practice (Oxford).

 

DEPUTY DIRECTOR

Charlotte Gill, Ph.D. | Curriculum Vitae
Dr. Charlotte Gill is an Assistant Professor at George Mason University and holds degrees in criminology and law from the Universities of Pennsylvania and Cambridge. Her primary research interests are community-based crime prevention and place-based approaches, particularly with juveniles and youth; community policing; program evaluation; and research synthesis. Dr. Gill has over ten years of experience in applied experimental and quasi-experimental research. She is a research partner on two Byrne Criminal Justice Innovation (BJA) grants to develop community-led approaches to tackling youth crime hot spots in Seattle, WA (with David Weisburd) and rural Kentucky, and three Smart Policing Initiative (BJA) grants: a randomized trial of collective efficacy policing in Brooklyn Park, MN (with David Weisburd); a randomized trial of coordinated police-mental health provider services in Roanoke County, VA (with Sue-Ming Yang); and a quasi-experiment examining RADAR (Risk Awareness, De-escalation And Referral), a community-based information sharing approach to improve police interactions with individuals with cognitive or behavioral health issues in Shoreline, WA (with the Police Foundation). Dr. Gill is the co-editor of the Campbell Collaboration Crime and Justice Group and a board member of the American Society of Criminology’s Division of Experimental Criminology. She was recently awarded an Andrew Carnegie Fellowship (2017-19) and received the Academy of Experimental Criminology’s Young Experimental Scholar award in 2012.

 

PRINCIPAL CEBCP FELLOW

Christopher Koper, Ph.D. | Curriculum Vitae
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Dr. Christopher S. Koper is an Associate Professor in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University and the Principal Fellow of George Mason’s Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy. Dr. Koper holds a Ph.D. in criminology and criminal justice from the University of Maryland and has nearly 30 years of experiencing conducting criminological research at George Mason, the Police Executive Research Forum, the University of Pennsylvania, the Urban Institute, the RAND Corporation, the Police Foundation, and other organizations. He has written and published extensively on issues related to firearms, policing, federal crime prevention efforts, research methods, and other topics. Dr. Koper has served as a lead or senior-level investigator for numerous projects funded by the U.S. Department of Justice, including Congressionally-mandated assessments of the 1994 federal assault weapons ban and the federal Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) program. He is the co-creator of the Evidence-Based Policing Matrix, a tool used by policing organizations internationally to visualize research results on police effectiveness and translate those results for practitioners and policymakers. Dr. Koper’s work on the methods of patrolling crime hot spots (often referred to as the “Koper curve” principle) is also used by numerous police agencies in the United States and abroad.

 

EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT

Ms. Naida Kuruvilla

 

SENIOR FELLOWS

Jim Bueermann, The Police Foundation
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Jim Bueermann is former Chief of Police in the Redlands, CA Police Department. He worked for the Redlands Police Department from 1978 until his retirement in June 2011, serving in every unit within the department. He was appointed Police Chief and Director of Housing, Recreation and Senior Services in May 1998. He holds a bachelor’s degree from California State University at San Bernardino and a master’s degree from the University of Redlands. In early 2007, he was named Honorary Fellow to the Academy of Experimental Criminology.

Jim Burch, The Police Foundation
pic-burchJim Burch is the Vice President for Strategic Initiatives at the Police Foundation, overseeing the Foundation’s efforts to advance policing through innovations in practice and technology as well as the Foundation’s strategic programs and management services. Prior to joining the Police Foundation in early 2015, Mr. Burch served for more than 20 years at the U.S. Department of Justice, having been appointed to various senior executive and leadership positions, including Acting Director of the Bureau of Justice Assistance (2009-2011), Deputy Assistant Attorney General (2011-2014) of the Office of Justice Programs (OJP), and Acting Assistant Director at the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) (2014-2015).

Stephen Mastrofski, George Mason University
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Stephen Mastrofski is University Professor in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society and Director of the Center for Justice Leadership and Management at George Mason University. His research interests include police discretion, police organizations and their reform, and systematic field observation methods in criminology. For several years Professor Mastrofski led a large team of researchers supporting and evaluating the transformation of the Trinidad and Tobago Police Service. He is currently engaged in an evaluation of community policing as a reform. He has been a Visiting Fellow at the National Institute of Justice and the Office of Community Oriented Policing and has consulted for a variety of public and private organizations. In 2000 he received the O.W. Wilson Award from the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences for education, research, and service on policing. He served on the National Academies of Sciences panel on Police Services and Practices that published the 2004 book, Fairness and Effectiveness in Policing: The Evidence. He is currently serving on the National Academies Committee on Proactive Policing. In 2008 he and his coauthors received the Law and Society Association’s article prize for their article using different organizational theories to explain Compstat’s implementation as a police reform. In 2010 he was elected a Fellow of the American Society of Criminology. In 2015 he received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Division of Policing of the American Society of Criminology.

Linda Merola, George Mason University
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Dr. Linda M. Merola is an Associate Professor of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University. Professor Merola’s academic interests relate to civil liberties, constitutional law, the judiciary, public opinion and legal psychology. She has published articles concerning terrorism, civil liberties, the judiciary, and various topics related to the public’s interaction with and knowledge of the criminal justice system. Professor Merola received a Ph.D. in government from Georgetown University, where she was awarded the Harold N. Glassman Dissertation Award for the most accomplished dissertation in the social science disciplines. In addition, Professor Merola holds a J.D. from the George Washington University Law School, where she served on The George Washington Law Review and was admitted to the Virginia State Bar Association. Professor Merola has also received advanced training in research methodology, statistics and survey/experimental methods through the National Science Foundation and Duke University, as well at the University of Michigan as a recipient of the Miller Scholarship.

Anthony Petrosino, WestEd
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Anthony Petrosino, Senior Research Associate at WestEd, specializes in social policy research, with an emphasis in evaluation and research synthesis. Petrosino’s extensive background and training in criminal justice and violence prevention help to expand the agency’s work in this area. He co-directs a quasi-experiment of a program for homeless, high-risk adults in Minnesota, a randomized experiment of a teen pregnancy prevention program in four major U.S. cities, and a comprehensive study of the Massachusetts urban violence prevention initiative. Petrosino has a long history of conducting research syntheses. Prior to joining WestEd, he helped develop the Campbell Collaboration (C2), an organization that conducts reviews of research on the effects of social interventions. For example, he led the C2’s pilot review (on the “Scared Straight” delinquency prevention program), and his paper based on that analysis won the Pro Humanitate Literary Award from the North American Child Welfare Resource Center in 2003. Petrosino was the Founding Coordinator for C2’s Crime & Justice Group, receiving a Distinguished Service Award for his service. He has published approximately 70 juried articles, and serves on the Editorial Boards for Evidence & Policy and the Journal of Experimental Criminology. Petrosino received WestEd’s Paul D. Hood Award for Distinguished Contribution to the Field, and was named Honorary Fellow by the Academy of Experimental Criminology. He recently was nominated to serve on a committee by the Institute of Medicine’s Forum on Global Violence Prevention. The committee is planning and implementing a special conference on evidence in violence prevention.

Allison Redlich, George Mason University
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Allison Redlich is a Professor in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University. She earned in PhD in Psychology at the University of California, Davis and then completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the Stanford University School of Medicine. In addition to her research interests in mental health courts and guilty pleas, Professor Redlich conducts research on the most effective methods to interview and interrogate suspects, and reduce the likelihood of false confessions. She has received support from the High-Value Detainee Interrogation Group (HIG) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation to examine the contextual and dynamic aspects of interrogation in criminal law enforcement and military settings, and from the Brain and Behavioral Research Foundation to examine the interrogation experiences of offenders with mental illness. She is the co-editor of the 2016 two-volume “International Developments and Practices in Investigative Interviewing and Interrogation” (Vol 1: Victims and Witnesses; Vol 2: Suspected Offenders) and the co-author of a 2010 scientific consensus paper on police-induced confessions. Professor Redlich currently sits on the editorial boards of five academic journals.

Laurie O. Robinson, George Mason University
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Laurie O. Robinson joined George Mason University in 2012 as the Clarence J. Robinson Professor of Criminology, Law and Society after more than three decades of involvement in national criminal justice policy. Reflecting that ongoing engagement, she was named by President Obama in 2014 to co-chair the White House Task Force on 21st Century Policing, charged with developing recommendations on ways to build greater trust between law enforcement and citizens in the wake of Ferguson. In 2014, she was also named to sit on the Congressionally created Colson Task Force on Federal Corrections, charged with addressing crowding in the federal prison system. Robinson twice served as a Senate-confirmed, Presidentially-appointed Assistant Attorney General for the U.S. Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs, DOJ’s research, statistics and criminal justice assistance arm. Her three years of service in the Obama Administration, coupled with seven years in the Clinton Administration, make her the longest serving head of that agency in its 45-year history. Robinson’s more recent tenure heading the $2.5 billion agency was marked by a focus on science: She set up a Science Advisory Board and created a “what works” clearinghouse for the criminal justice field. Between her stints at DOJ, Robinson directed the University of Pennsylvania’s Master of Science Program in Criminology. During her first tenure at DOJ in the 1990s, she led the federal government’s engagement with states and localities on community-based crime control. Her agency’s annual budget grew from $800 million in 1993 to over $4 billion in 2000 and she oversaw the largest increase in federal spending on crime-related research in the nation’s history. She also spearheaded major federal initiatives on violence against women, drug treatment courts, and law enforcement technology. She serves on a number of national boards, including those of the Vera Institute of Justice and the Center for Naval Analysis (CNA), and on the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Law and Justice.

Nigel Waters, University of Calgary (Emeritus)
pic-watersNigel Waters taught at the University of Calgary from 1975 to 2007. He was promoted to Full Professor in 1990 and in 1999 became the Founding Director of the Masters in GIS Program at the University of Calgary. In 2007 he joined GMU and was appointed as a Full Professor in the Department of Geography and Geoinformation Science and the Director of the Center of Excellence for Geographic information Science. These positions he held until 2014 when he was subsequently appointed as an Affiliate Faculty Member in the College of Science. He has published extensively in the peer reviewed literature on the application of GIScience in transportation, medical geography, environmental science, spatial statistics and related areas. He is a former President of the Western Canadian Association of Geographers, and was an associate editor of GeoWorld (previously GIS World) where for 21 years he contributed the Edge Nodes column (1989-2014). In 2014 he co-edited the book Data Mining for Geoinformatics: Methods and Applications. From 2011 to 2014 he was the Editor of Cartographica: The International Journal for Geographic Information and Geovisualization. In 2014 he received the Award of Distinction from the Canadian Cartographic Association and in 2015 was the recipient of the Inaugural Award from the GIScience Study Group of the Canadian Association of Geographers for Lifetime Achievement and GIScience Excellence. In 2017 he contributed articles on the History of GIS and Tobler’s First Law of Geography to the International Encyclopedia of Geography. He has served on a number of graduate advisory committees in the Center for Evidenced-Based Crime Policy.

James Willis, George Mason University
pic-willisJames Willis is an Associate Professor in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University. He earned his B.A. in Administration of Justice from The Pennsylvania State University and Ph.D. in sociology from Yale University. At Yale he was a Jacob K. Javits Fellow and his dissertation examining the transportation of British convicts to America and Australia was awarded the Sociology Department’s Marvin B. Sussman prize for the best dissertation submitted in the past two years. In 2008 he and his coauthors, Stephen Mastrofski and David Weisburd, received the Law and Society Association’s article prize for a paper they published on Compstat. His current research focuses on examining the craft of policing (including its relationship to science) and assessing the effects of technology on police organization and practice.

David Wilson, George Mason University
pic-wilsonDavid B. Wilson, PhD, is a Professor and Chair of the Criminology, Law and Society Department at George Mason University. His research interests focus broadly on issues related to changing the criminal behavior of juvenile and adult offenders. More specifically, his research examines the effectiveness of offender rehabilitation and crime prevention efforts. He is also interested in advancing meta-analysis and program evaluation methods. His researched has focused on a range of topics, including the effectiveness of juvenile delinquency interventions, juvenile curfews, school-based prevention programs, correctional boot-camps, court-mandated batterer intervention programs, and drug-courts; the effects of sugar on children’s behavior; and the effects of alcohol on violent behavior. He co-authored a book on the methods of meta-analysis with Mark Lipsey that is widely used. He is an co-editor of the Journal of Experimental Criminology, past consulting editor for Psychological Bulletin, and editor of Crime and Justice Group of the Campbell Collaboration. He was awarded the Marcia Guttentag Award for Early Promise as an Evaluator by the American Evaluation Association in 1999 and the Frederick Mosteller Award for Distinctive Contributions to Systematic Reviewing.

Sue-Ming Yang, George Mason University
pic-yangSue-Ming Yang is an assistant professor in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University. She received her PhD from the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Maryland. Her current research focuses on understanding the relationship between stereotypes, race, and perceived disorder in urban settings. She also studies place-based criminology, disorder-crime association, experimental research methods, and international terrorism.

 

RESEARCH ASSOCIATES & POST DOCS

Zoe Vitter, M.A.
pic-vetterZoe Vitter is a doctoral student in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University. She received a MA in the same in 2014. Her research interests include crime and place, evidence-based policy, issues of youth crime and justice, and community. Zoe is currently a Graduate Research Assistant in the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy.

 

Heather Vovak, Ph.D. | Curriculum Vitae
pic-vovakHeather Vovak is a post-doctoral research associate at the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy at George Mason University. She received her B.S. in Political Science and Psychology from Heidelberg University in 2005, her M.A. in Political Science from the University of Akron in 2011, and her Ph.D. in Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University in 2016. Her research interests include evidence-based policing, the relationship between clearance rates and crime rates, police investigations, and research methods.

Clair White, Ph.D. | Curriculum Vitae
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Clair White completed her Ph.D. student at Arizona State University in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice. She is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy at George Mason University. Her research interests include communities and crime, mental health and use of service, and illicit prescription drug use. She is currently implementing a mental health community policing program in Baltimore that focuses on connecting residents of crime hot spots to mental health and behavioral services.

 

RESEARCH ASSISTANTS

Tori Goldberg, M.A.
pic-goldbergTori Goldberg is a doctoral student in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University. She received an MA in Criminology, Law, and Society from George Mason University in 2013 and her BA in Psychology from Clark University in 2011. Her research interests include evidence based crime interventions, organizational issues, re-entry and corrections, and the intersection between mental health and the criminal justice system.

 

Rachel Jensen | Curriculum Vitae
jensenRachel Jensen is currently a masters student in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society. A former Schreyer Scholar, she graduated with honors from Penn State with her bachelors in Applied Psychology. Her research interests include evidence-based policy and police training on mental health, particularly Autism Spectrum Disorder.

 

William Johnson, M.A.
johnson William Johnson is a doctoral student and Provost Scholar in the Department of Criminology Law and Society at George Mason University. He received a Bachelors of Science in Criminology from George Mason University in December 2012 with a minor in Sociology. His research interests include hate crime legislation and implementation, organizations, and the use of emergent technology in policing.

 

L. Caitlin Kanewske, M.S.
kanewske L. Caitlin Kanewske is a doctoral student in the department of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University. She received her MS degree in Justice, Law and Society from American University in 2014 and her BA in English from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) in 2010. From 2010 to 2011 she was a security threat group special instructor within the New Mexico Corrections Department. Her research interests include evidence-based crime interventions, mental health, prison reform, and correctional programming.

Matthew Nelson | Curriculum Vitae
nelsonMatthew Nelson is currently a doctoral student in the Criminology, Law, and Society Department at George Mason University and a graduate research assistant at the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy. He received a M.A. in Criminal Justice from the Pennsylvania State University in 2011. His research interests include evidence-based crime interventions, crime and place, experimental methods, and program evaluation.

Jordan Nichols, M.A. | Curriculum Vitae
nichols Jordan Nichols is a doctoral student in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society. She received her M.A. in Criminology from the Department in December 2016. Her research interests include policing, homeland security, and evidence-based policy. Jordan is currently working on policing and security projects within the Center.

 

Sang Jun Park, M.A., ABD | Curriculum Vitae
logo Sang Jun Park is a doctoral student in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society. He received his M.A. in Community Planning from the University of Cincinnati in 2013. His dissertation examines crime concentrations across all 43 police jurisdictions in England and Wales, testing the salience of Weisburd’s Law of Crime Concentration (supervisor: Professor Cynthia Lum). Sang Jun’s expertise is in geographic information systems, geo-spatial analyses, social media, and web design.

Amber Scherer, M.A. | Curriculum Vitae
pic-schererAmber Scherer is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society and a graduate research assistant at the Center for Evidence Based Crime Policy. She received her MA in Forensic Psychology from the John Jay College of Criminal Justice. She formerly worked as a part-time research associate at the Police Foundation in Washington, DC and with the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Behavioral Science Unit in Quantico, VA. Her research interests include evidence-based policing practices, the translation and implementation of research into law enforcement practice, the effectiveness of criminal investigative practices, and wrongful convictions. Her dissertation focuses on identifying effective practices for robbery investigations.

Paige St. Clair
StClairPaige St. Clair is currently a master’s student in the Department of Criminology, Law, and Society. She received her B.A. in Psychology and Women, Gender, and Sexuality from the University of Virginia in May of 2016. Her research interests include human trafficking, policing, evidence-based policy, and homeland security. She is currently working on a project on mental health and policing with the Center.

Megan Stoltz, M.A. | Curriculum Vitae
stoltzMegan Stoltz is a doctoral student in the department and a Presidential Scholar. She received a BA in psychology and a BS in management, both from George Mason University, and a MA in forensic psychology from Marymount University. Her interests include evidence-based crime policy, terrorism, corrections, legal psychology, and the intersection of mental health and the criminal justice system.

 

Sean Wire
pic-wireSean Wire is currently a doctoral student in the Criminology, Law, and Society Department at George Mason University and a graduate research assistant at the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy. He received a B.S. in Criminology and B.A. in Psychology from The College of New Jersey in 2015. His research interests include evidence-based crime interventions, policy application, crime and place, and policing.

 

Xiaoyun Wu, M.A. | Curriculum Vitae
pic-wuXiaoyun Wu is currently a doctoral student in the Criminology, Law and Society Program at George Mason University. She received a Bachelor in Law from China University of Political Science and Law in 2013 and a Masters of Arts in Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University. Her research interests include evidence-based policing, crime and place, experimental criminology, and law and criminal justice.

 

 

AFFILIATED SCHOLARS

Martin Andresen (Simon Fraser University)
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Dr. Martin A. Andresen is a professor in the School of Criminology and Institute for Canadian Urban Research Studies at Simon Fraser University. He is also an associate member of the Department of Geography, Simon Fraser University. Dr. Andresen received his B.A. and M.A. degrees in economics from Simon Fraser University, and his Ph.D. in geography from the University of British Columbia. Dr. Andresen’s research interests are in crime and places, environmental criminology, the geography of crime, spatial crime analysis, and applied spatial statistics and geographical information analysis. Most of Dr. Andresen’s recent research has involved investigations of the spatial aspect of criminal events at a variety of scales and various applications of the spatial point pattern test he developed. He is a member of the Crime and Place Working Group within the CEBCP Research Program on Crime and Place and is on the editorial boards for Journal of Criminal Justice; Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice; International Criminal Justice Review; Criminology, Criminal Justice, Law & Society; and Methodological Innovations Online.

Breanne Cave (Police Foundation)
pic-caveBreanne Cave is a Senior Research Associate at the Police Foundation. She has worked on a number of federally funded research projects on police technology, homeland security, and public health and safety. Her research on policing, crime and place, and homeland security issues can be found in the Journal of Experimental Criminology, Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies and Management, and Police Policy and Research: An International Journal, as well as in edited volumes on crime and place and counter-terrorism. Breanne received her B.A. in Criminal Justice and M.A. in Justice Administration from Norwich University. She received her PhD in Criminology, Law & Society from George Mason University in Spring 2016..

Julie Grieco (Police Foundation)
pic-griecoDr. Julie Grieco is a Senior Research Associate at the Police Foundation. She received her B.S. in Psychology from the University of Central Florida in 2007, her M.A. in Forensic Psychology from Marymount University in 2008, and her Ph.D. in Criminology, Law and Society from George Mason University in 2016. While at George Mason, she worked for five years for CEBCP as a graduate research assistant on the Matrix Demonstration Project. Her research interests include the individual determinants of adoption of evidence-based practices, public opinion of the police, and the translation of research knowledge for everyday use by practitioners.

Elizabeth Groff (Temple University)
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Dr. Elizabeth Groff is an associate professor in the Temple University Department of Criminal Justice. Dr. Groff received her B.S. and M.A. degrees in geography from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte and Ph.D. in geography from the University of Maryland at College Park. She also has an M.A. in criminology and criminal justice from the University of Maryland at College Park. Dr. Groff’s primary research interests are in crime and place; modeling geographical influences on human activity; agent-based modeling as a methodology; crime prevention; and policing. Her most recent research is a field experiment testing whether citizen notification can prevent subsequent burglaries which is being conducted in partnership with the Baltimore County, MD and the Redlands, CA Police Departments (with Travis Taniguchi). She is a member of the Crime and Place Working Group within the CEBCP Research Program on Crime and Place.

Julie Hibdon (Southern Illinois University)
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Dr. Julie Hibdon is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Southern Illinois University Carbondale. She formerly was a Research Associate in the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy. She received her Ph.D. in Criminology, Law and Society from George Mason University in 2011. She also holds an M.A. in Administration of Justice from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. Dr. Hibdon’s research interests include crime and place, cognitions of crime places and dangerous places, fear of crime, and policing. Dr. Hibdon has worked and collaborated on a number of research projects including the Trinidad and Tobago Police Service Project; an experimental evaluation of License Plate Recognition (LPR) Technologies for Law Enforcement; an evaluation of Transportation Security Administration (TSA) strategy to security at airports; and most recently an evaluation of the impact of technologies on police organizations and practices.

Josh Hinkle (Georgia State University)
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Dr. Joshua Hinkle is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology at Georgia State University. He received his doctoral degree in criminology and criminal justice from the University of Maryland in the summer of 2009 after completing his Master’s degree in the department in May 2005. Dr. Hinkle’s research interests include evidence-based policing, the disorder-crime nexus, fear of crime and experimental methods. His research has been funded by the National Institute of Justice and the National Science Foundation. His work appears in journals such as Criminology, Criminology & Public Policy, and the Journal of Experimental Criminology.

Brian Lawton, John Jay College (CUNY)
pic-lawtonDr. Brian Lawton is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City. Prior to coming to John Jay he has worked as an Assistant Professor at Sam Houston State University and most recently at George Mason University. His research interests focus on the intersection of crime and health, place and crime, and fear and safety concerns. He received his doctorate in Criminal Justice from Temple University and has had research articles published in journals such as Justice Quarterly, Quantitative Criminology and the Journal of Crime and Delinquency.

Ajima Olaghere, Temple University
pic-lawtonDr. Ajima Olaghere is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice at Temple University. She received her Ph.D. from George Mason University in Criminology, Law and Society in 2015. She also received her M.A. from George Mason University in Justice, Law, and Crime Policy in 2010. While attending George Mason University she served as a graduate research assistant for the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy and as a post doctoral research fellow under Dr. David B. Wilson learning the latest quantitative and qualitative data synthesis techniques also known as meta-analysis and meta-aggregation. Dr. Olaghere’s research interest include integrating qualitative and quantitative research elements, meta-synthesis, and exploring models to improve police and community relations.

Travis Taniguchi (RTI International)
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Travis Taniguchi is a Research Criminologist at RTI International.. He received his B.S. in Criminology and Criminal Justice from Chaminade University of Honolulu and his M.A. and Ph.D. in Criminal Justice from Temple University. His research interests include program and policy evaluation, crime and place, street gang dynamics, and the spatial distribution of drug markets. He is dedicated to expanding and evaluating the partnerships between researchers and practitioners. His publications can be found in Justice Quarterly and the Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency.

Gheorghe Tecuci (George Mason University)
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Dr. Gheorghe Tecuci is Professor of Computer Science and Director of the Learning Agents Center at George Mason University (http://lac.gmu.edu), member of the Romanian Academy, and former chair of Artificial Intelligence at the U.S. Army War College. He has followed a career-long interest in the advancement of a computational theory and technology for the development of cognitive assistants that learn complex problem-solving expertise directly from human experts, support experts and non-experts in problem solving and decision making, and teach their problem-solving expertise to students. This theory has recently been extended with a computational theory of evidence-based reasoning, and has been employed in the development of powerful cognitive assistants for intelligence analysis. He has published over 190 papers and has recently co-authored two books, “Knowledge Engineering: Building Personal Learning Assistants for Evidence-based Reasoning,” and “Intelligence Analysis as Discovery of Evidence, Hypotheses, and Arguments: Finding and Connecting the Dots.”

Cody Telep (Arizona State University)
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Cody Telep is an Assistant Professor in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Arizona State University. He received his PhD from the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University in 2013. While at George Mason, he worked for five years for CEBCP as a graduate research assistant and research associate. He received an MA from the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Maryland in 2008. His research interests include innovations in policing, experimental criminology, evidence-based policy, and police education. His recent work has appeared in Justice Quarterly, Police Quarterly, Journal of Criminal Justice Education, and Journal of Experimental Criminology.

Alese Wooditch (Temple University)
wooditchAlese Wooditch is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice at Temple University. She received her PhD from the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University in 2016. While attending George Mason University, she served three years as a graduate research assistant in the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy and four years as a research associate in the Center for Advancing Correctional Excellence. She formerly served as a Criminal Intelligence Analyst with the U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Labor Racketeering and Fraud Investigations. Alese received her MA in criminal justice from Penn State University in 2009. Her research interests include crime and place, risk-needs-responsivity, experimental and computational criminology, quantitative methods, and human trafficking.

 

VISITING SCHOLARS

Victoria Garnett (2015 Fulbright Scholar, Metropolitan Police Service, London UK)
Richie Adams (2014 Fulbright Scholar, Police Scotland)
Serena Favarin (2013, from Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore – Milano)
Professor Sue-Ming Yang (2013-2014, from National Chung Cheng University)

 

INTERNS

Aimee Arceneaux (2017)
Connor Xavios (Spring, 2015)
Jordan Nichols (2012)
Jacqueline Davis (Summer 2011, from University of Queensland, Australia)
Felicia Keith (Summer 2010, from UC-Irvine)
Sarah Parham (Summer 2010, Undergraduate Apprenticeship Award Winner)
Laura Coffrin (Spring 2010)
Monika Singh (Fall 2009)
Brittany Davenport (Fall 2008-Spring 2009)