David Weisburd, Distinguished Professor in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University and Executive Director of the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy, was awarded the 2010 Stockholm Prize in Criminology.

The International Jury chose Dr. Weisburd for his groundbreaking work on hot spots policing and crime displacement and his series of experiments showing that intensified police patrol at high crime “hot spots” does not merely push crime around the corner. In the video above, Dr. Weisburd presents on his work in this area in “The Crucial Question for Crime: Not Who Done it, but Where Done It?

Full information about Professor Weisburd’s award.

ABOUT THE PRIZE

The Stockholm Prize has been established under the aegis of the Swedish Ministry of Justice and is considered the one of the highest international achievements in the field. The prize is awarded for outstanding achievements in criminological research or for the application of research results by practitioners for the reduction of crime and the advancement of human rights.

The objectives of The Stockholm Prize in Criminology are to promote the development of

  • improved knowledge on causes of crime on an individual and structural level
  • more effective and humane public policies for dealing with criminal offenders
  • greater knowledge of alternative crime prevention strategies inside and outside the judicial system
  • policies for helping the victims of crime
  • better ways to reduce the global problem of illegal or abusive practices that may occur in the administration of justice.

The prize is awarded to one recipient annually, with the possibility of the prize being shared among co-recipients. The prize amounts to at least 1 000 000 SEK. An independent international jury selects and appoints the prize recipient(s) from the nominations submitted. The jury consists of members representing both practitioners and academics.